Saint Veronica wood carved - stained 3 col. View larger

Saint Veronica wood carved - stained 3 col.

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St. Veronica Hand carved Wooden Religious Statues. Feastday July 12

Her name appears for the first time in the apocryphal Gospels and refers to the woman with a hemorrhagic ulcer named Bernike in Greek, Veronica in Latin, who, while begging Jesus for his healing, was able to touch the hem of his cloak while passing through the crowd and was instantly healed. Christian tradition tells us that the pious woman later devoted her life to spreading the good news and traveled throughout Europe, leaving the linen with the Holy Face ("the true icon", as her name predestined it) in Rome and continued on to France where she began the conversion of the Gauls. The episode of Veronica wiping the face of Jesus with a cloth has become very popular, almost completely obscuring the episode of the hemorrhaging woman, who, according to some, is the same woman, although there is no documentary proof. Saint Veronica has a particular cult in France, where she is considered to be the woman who, after the death of the Savior, married Zacchaeus and went to evangelize Gaul. She would have died in the hermitage of Soulac. Also called Saint Venice or Venisse, she is the patron saint in France of linen merchants and laundresses.

The name of Veronica, recurs for the first time in the apocryphal Gospels (Acts of Pilate ch. 7) and refers to the hemorrhaging woman named Bernike in Greek, Veronica in Latin, who, begging Jesus for his healing, while passing through the crowd, managed to touch the hem of his cloak, healing instantly.

Jesus asked who had touched him, and the apostles replied, "It is the crowd that is squeezing you on every side," but Jesus insisted because he felt a force coming out of him, and then the hemorrhagic woman came forward and threw herself at his feet and declared before everyone the reason why she had touched him and the benefit she had received. Jesus answered her, "Daughter, your faith has saved you; go in peace!", Lk. 8:43-48.

The historian Eusebius (265-340) in his 'Historia eccl.' (VII, 18), tells us that in Caesarea Philippi there was the house of the miraculous hemorrhagic Bernike, supposedly originally from Edessa in Syria, and that in front of the door of the house stood a bronze statue of a woman bent on one knee with her hands outstretched in an act of entreaty, in front of her the statue of a man standing, wrapped in a cloak, holding out his hand to the woman; at his feet grew an unknown plant raised up to the cloak and considered an effective remedy for all kinds of illness.

The statue of the man, was said to represent Jesus and Eusebius concludes by saying, that at the time of his stay in that city, the bronze group existed. Another author, Sozomeno, says that the monument erected in honor of the Redeemer in Cesarea of Filippo, was demolished during the persecution of Giuliano the Apostate, (331-363).

From the fifteenth century onwards, devotion to Veronica took shape in the West as a figure in the group of pious women who wiped the face of Jesus with a cloth or shroud as he climbed Calvary with the cross, leaving his face imprinted on the cloth, thus creating a whole series of variations on the older image of the hemorrhoid, depicted in the statue of Paneas (Caesarea Philippi).

The woman would then come to Rome, bringing with her the sacred relic; some apocryphal texts such as the "Vindicta Salvatoris", say that the Roman official Volusianus, violently seizes the cloth to the woman and brings it to Tiberius, who as soon as he sees it heals from leprosy, Veronica leaves everything in Palestine and follows her cloth to Rome, got it back, keeps it with her and before dying gives it to Pope St. Clement.

In the following centuries, Veronica was worshipped in alternating phases, but she does not appear in the ancient Martyrologies, nor in the Medieval ones; in some secondary Martyrologies she is mentioned on February 4.
The tradition of the woman who dries the face of Jesus with a cloth, from which the name Veronica 'true icon' would have sprung, has certainly taken great diffusion obscuring almost completely, the episode of the hemorrhaging woman, who would be according to some, the same woman, although there are no certainties in the many documents more or less apocryphal.

She has been represented in many sculptures and paintings, which have prolonged the image until our days, including her in the characters of the pious practice of the Via Crucis at the sixth station. The long iconographic itinerary that recalls her with the famous Holy Shroud, the first and only portrait of the Holy Face, culminated in the great statue of Veronica, the work of the sculptor Francesco Mocchi in the seventeenth century, placed in St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican, the center of Christianity.

From the thirteenth century onwards, an image of the face of Christ, known as the 'veil of Veronica' (which Dante also mentions in Paragraph XXXI, 104), was venerated in St. Peter's in Rome, and scholars have identified it for the most part with the late Byzantine icon currently preserved there.

From the thirteenth century onwards, an image of the face of Christ was venerated in St. Peter's in Rome, known as the 'veil of Veronica' (which Dante also mentions in Paragraph XXXI, 104), which scholars have identified for the most part with the late Byzantine icon currently preserved there.
The origin of the cult of the Holy Face is connected to these devotions. Saint Veronica has a particular cult in France, where she is considered to be the woman who, after the death of the Savior, went to marry Zacchaeus to evangelize Gaul and is said to have died in the hermitage of Soulac; also called Saint Venice or Venisse, she is the patron saint in France of linen merchants and laundresses.